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Dublin: 11 °C Thursday 18 October, 2018
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'A gambler can lose everything in an instant, destroying countless lives around them in the process'

‘We probably won’t know the impact of online gambling on our society for another ten years’, writes John Halligan.

Quinoa and grilled sourdough salad is a classic for summer evening supper or lunch

It’s a good idea to cease watering onions for about two weeks before harvesting to help with that drying out, writes Michael Kelly.

'Despite Newbridge and Liam Miller outcomes, the GAA lost as it looked to be bullied by public opinion'

‘This is a GAA that clearly wasn’t reading the room, or the country’, writes Declan Lee.

'The granny grant is a trivial pre-Budget kite, indifferent to parents and disrespectful to grandparents'

Our government can and should do better, writes Frances Byrne.

'The High Court restaurant has been a sanctuary for people left waiting days for a judge, until now'

The restaurant has been a place to take time out and get away from the maelstrom until it closed this week, writes Stuart Gilhooly.

Frontline gardai need tasers and they need them now

The Garda Representative Association believes tasers can help gardai protect themselves, the public – and even offenders.

'Galway has morphed into a small city - but we're stuck with the services of a town'

Traffic jams are not just for Race Week, says Niall O Tuathail; they are now a year-round problem.

'We need to use every avenue possible to help ex-offenders find gainful employment'

Those seeking to begin a new life after a criminal conviction regularly discover that the obstacles to entering the labour market are simply too great to overcome, writes Vivian Geiran and Michael Donnellan.

Caroline Foran: 6 ways to challenge perfectionist thinking

For a healthy perfectionist, failure won’t necessarily be celebrated – let’s not expect miracles – but it won’t pin them down like a gigantic paperweight, writes Caroline Foran.

'The State pension wasn't designed to support the lifestyles people have in mind'

Within the complex landscape of pension investment, auto-enrolment provides a compelling case for increasing and encouraging pension take-up, writes Jerry Moriarty.

Emilie Pine: 'I've been asked to be the 'token woman'. I don't like it but I say yes'

Until we achieve real cultural diversity – which is a lot bigger than heterosexual, cisgender white women getting on panels – we can’t rest, writes Emilie Pine.

Irish Country music and dancehalls: 'The cause of the ruin of hundreds of young girls'

The Catholic Church campaigned against informal house dances and crossroads dances, seeing them as opportunities for immorality, writes Kevin Martin.

In the garden: 'French beans are, I think, one of the most underrated of vegetables' GIY

In the garden: 'French beans are, I think, one of the most underrated of vegetables'

Of all the legume family, they are my favourite to eat, writes Michael Kelly.

'I couldn’t do without cocaine, couldn’t face talking to people without a few lines in me'

“It started recreationally, just dabbling, and then it went from there. First it would just be at the weekend, then it started to spill over into the week.”

From The42 'Liam Miller deserves more than to be an excuse for people to have a cut off each other' Column

'Liam Miller deserves more than to be an excuse for people to have a cut off each other'

The recent debate over Páirc Uí Chaoimh has turned into a point-scoring exercise between fans of the two sports, writes John O’Sullivan.

'I stopped eating for days at a time, having no appetite or will to carry on and live'

“There are plenty of people in the same situation as me. Many are even worse off. Don’t we deserve the chance to get better?”

Court of Appeal: 'The new court has failed to meet expectations'

Policies to reduce the backlog and to increase judicial efficiency should be put forward and rapidly put into effect, writes Seth Barrett Tillman.

'For those concerned about the decline in real wages, there is a solution - join a trade union'

Productivity at work is up, but we need to see decent pay rises and career progression for all workers. Trade union membership is the key to this, writes Paul Dillon.

Sinn Féin and abstentionism: 'The party will eventually need people to take oaths for Ireland'

Abstentionism has been a central policy of Sinn Féin since the party’s foundation in 1905, but condemnation of the practice has sharpened since the Brexit referendum, writes Caoimhín De Barra.

'800 million people globally could be made redundant by technology over the next ten years'

Partnering with the big technology companies to implement a digital apprenticeship scheme would be game changing for Ireland’s economic prospects, writes Gary Gannon.

Saying goodbye to Dad: 'I grappled with how I could fully express how much he means to me'

In the final week of my stay, my mind turned to how I would leave my father on what would definitely be the most heavy hearted of all our farewells, writes Larry Donnelly.

Pope Francis: 'He is trying to encourage a more adult, participatory institutional model'

It will require imagination and critical engagement from other agents in the Church if the change he envisages is to happen, writes Gerry O’Hanlon SJ.

Dating post Brexit: 'You're telling me Ireland has got its own Prime Minister?'

Online dating is awkward enough without having to go into the history of Anglo-Irish relations, writes Peter Flanagan.

Growing up in The Liberties: 'We thought we were posh because we had our own hall door'

There have been some great characters in The Liberties over the years, writes Josie Sheehan.

GIY tomatoes: 'We are in what I like to call 'bruschetta' season'

It’s a wonderful time of the year, when a simple lunch or dinner can easily be conjured up from nothing, once you have some decent sourdough bread in the bread bin, writes Michael Kelly.

Children with disabilities: 'The assessment of need system is in disarray'

Why, at a time when we should be advancing the rights of children with disabilities as citizens of this State, are we letting them down more than ever, asks Paddy Connolly.

Letter from America: 'Trump isn’t perfect but voting for him sent a message – and I’m still glad I did'

Donald Trump’s central animating impulse in public life has long been that his country gets a raw deal, writes Larry Donnelly.

'Catholic schools are the most sought after in their area, by families of all faiths and none'

A comprehensive deal with the State is in the best interests of the Church, as well as the broader education system, writes Jonathan Tiernan.

Mandela and 'the unbreakable bonds of friendship and solidarity' with Ireland

Tánaiste Simon Coveney on why Dublin is the perfect venue to celebrate Madiba’s struggle – and why Ireland will co-host Nelson Mandela Peace Summit at UN this autumn.

Male-dominated boards: 'Excessive risk taking, testosterone driven egos and a lack of duty of care'

The glass ceiling is triple-glazed in many organisations, writes Kieran Moynihan.

Column: 'We are required to provide a sick cert to cover the period of absence to give birth'

If we have any hope of enticing more women into public office here in Ireland, the existing policy on maternity supports and arrangements needs significant reform, writes Senator Lorraine Clifford-Lee.

Digital DNA: 'Every time we go online we leave a bit of ourselves behind'

Being alert to how our data is being used and asking why it’s being gathered in the first place equips us with the skills we need to protect our digital DNA, writes Sean Crowley.

Lyme disease: 'I became a shadow, housebound, a virtual recluse'

“I thought about ending it all. I was worn out. Beat down. Broke. Defeated.”

Kindness: Change your life and make the world a kinder place

Can you get someone to stop talking without feeling and appearing rude? Yes. There are ways to do it kindly, writes Gill Hasson.

'Setting guidelines around relationships at work is a wise and obvious next step for employers'

Fraternisation policies are a welcome addition and should not be trivialised, writes Stephanie Regan.

Column: 'This World Cup continues to laugh in the face of football convention'

The international game is beautifully flawed by design and the world at large is benefitting from this World Cup of imperfections, writes Colm Boohig.

In the garden: Michael Kelly's top tips for conserving water use GIY

In the garden: Michael Kelly's top tips for conserving water use

In these heatwave conditions, watering is indeed necessary and conserving water becomes a significant challenge, writes Michael Kelly.

Living wage: 'Ireland is an outlier in terms of its high levels of low pay'

Other countries seem to manage fine with decent wages, writes Robert Sweeney.

Inclusive education: 'Nobody with a print disability should get left behind'

The barriers have to be broken down and it starts with the Department of Education, writes Chris White.

Affordable housing: 'Taxing high end real estate transfers could fix the problem'

The city of Vancouver has increased taxes on unoccupied properties and the Province of British Columbia has just levied a tax on absentee owners, writes Chuck Collins.