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Dublin: 12 °C Monday 21 May, 2018

#Read Me

# read-me - Yesterday’s News

Epilepsy: 'My emotions are heightened and I'm overwhelmed by difficult or upsetting situations'

Living with epilepsy is challenging, it is a challenge for those who have the condition but it’s also a challenge for their friends and family, writes Eva-Jayne Gaffney.

'I had always found work soul destroying, but had accepted this as the norm'

Now the idea of working for an organisation that is primarily driven by profit nauseates me, writes Ian Cumbers.

Column: 'Those who beat the health insurance penalty deadline are at risk of overpaying'

Health insurance is expensive enough so don’t pay any more than you have to, writes Dermot Goode.

# read-me - Saturday 19 May, 2018

GIY: Get creative with delicious new potatoes using this Spanish tortilla recipe

Serve as a generous lunch or light dinner with a salad of peppery green leaves, writes Michael Kelly.

Lad culture: 'We need to tackle masculinity head-on'

This is not to slap down men as a whole, but to encourage a more positive type of society, writes Stephen Todd.

# read-me - Friday 18 May, 2018

'I'm not amoral, not stupid, and not promiscuous. I took every precaution. I still got pregnant'

“Am I selfish for taking control of my own fate rather than simply letting life happen to me? I do not see it that way.”

# read-me - Thursday 17 May, 2018

Maria Walsh: 'It might be a questioning glance or a curt refusal to shake my hand'

On International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia, we must stand in solidarity, writes Maria Walsh.

# read-me - Wednesday 16 May, 2018

Column: 'Why did I fall so hard? Why did I make myself so vulnerable to him?'

The Domestic Violence Bill 2017 has to be one of the most significant pieces of legislation to come before the Oireachtas so far this year, writes Patricia Tsouros.

# read-me - Tuesday 15 May, 2018

Replacing Phil Hogan: 'Other countries have a different attitude and send their elite'

In the past the position of Ireland’s Commissioner has often been given as a reward to an ally, or as a way to get a troublesome prince out of the realm, writes Dominic Hannigan.

# read-me - Monday 14 May, 2018

It's been a worrying two weeks - but please don't stop getting smear tests

Professor of Gynaecological Oncology at UCD on why it’s vital for women to continue with the cervical screening programme right now.

Column: 'We are haemorrhaging €5-6bn per year to pay for expensive and dirty fuels'

Our government itself is the biggest fossil fuel addict, given all of the excise duty and carbon taxes it collects, writes Grattan Healy.

# read-me - Sunday 13 May, 2018

Column: 'We are ill. We are not faking this illness. It is not in our heads'

Before the illness struck me twenty years ago next month, I was a self-employed artist, writes Corina Duyn.

Brian Merriman: 'Identity theatre is always relevant'

I dramatise stories that were impossible to imagine could be told or staged, writes Brian Merriman.

Sharon Donnery: 'There were no female role models, no one I could aspire to be like'

Tools like targets or quotas are not about artificially levelling the playing field – they are to ensure access to the field in the first place, writes Sharon Donnery.

# read-me - Saturday 12 May, 2018

'I was the first of my family to go to university and this week I paid off the last of my loan'

While I repaid the money they lent me, I owe my local Credit Union so much more, writes Gavin Nugent.

Chickweed: 'Not only is it edible, it’s considered to be a nutritional powerhouse'

It’s a nice surprise to discover that what you have considered a real nuisance in the veg patch, could in fact turn out to be a blessing, writes Michael Kelly.

Column: 'I was lucky, but women's healthcare must not come down to luck'

My consultant highlighted to me the fallibility of the smear screening results at that time and encouraged me to have scopes in addition to smears, writes Stephanie Regan.

# read-me - Friday 11 May, 2018

Larry Donnelly: 'There is a definite sense that the net is tightening around Donald Trump'

However, the president’s job approval ratings have been on a clear, upward arc as of late, writes Larry Donnelly.

# read-me - Thursday 10 May, 2018

'I was nine weeks pregnant when I took an abortion pill - after staring at it for hours'

“I was in a very bad situation where continuing a pregnancy just wasn’t possible, health wise or financially.”

# read-me - Wednesday 9 May, 2018

Column: 'Farmers are asking 'where’s my share of this economic boom?''

There is a physical and mental strain on the family farm that can be compounded by financial pressures, writes Richard Moeran.

# read-me - Tuesday 8 May, 2018

Floundering forests: The challenges facing the Irish forestry industry

It will take 100 years to achieve the government’s target of 18% forestry cover, writes Dermot McNally.

# read-me - Monday 7 May, 2018

Borderline Personality Disorder: 'My emotions are overwhelming and almost impossible to regulate'

For me, BPD is constant work to find the middle ground, writes Lucie Kavanagh.

Standoffs with scorpions: The reality of filming in Sub-Saharan Africa

However, it is through that lens we can reveal the real subjects of this documentary series are the rural communities in Kenya, Mozambique and Uganda, writes Brian Gray.

'I'm 27. I'm living at home. Going through the same hall door since I was in a school uniform'

But a new plan for Inchicore means that ordinary young people like me can dream about renting at a price I can afford, writes Nicola Quinn.

# read-me - Sunday 6 May, 2018

'Mad, loony, mental, psycho or schizo': Behind every mental health diagnosis is a person

It could easily be you who needs someone to start a conversation in the future, writes Nicola Hampson.

'As Ireland prepares for its referendum, I'm in the middle of another divisive campaign'

On 27 May Colombians will go to the polls in the first round of a presidential election, writes Kieran Duffy.

'There are days I don’t speak to another grown-up. Online chats keep me going'

Social media provides company at 6am when you’ve been up all night with a crying baby, writes Andrea Mara.

# read-me - Saturday 5 May, 2018

The past isn't the past, it's not even over: We can't discard Junior Cert History

Author John Connell agrees with President Higgins that making the study of History optional at junior cycle is to lose a part of our national identity.

Bio-insecticide Supernemos: 'Sometimes GIYing is not for the faint hearted'

In a demise worthy of the cheesiest horror movie the nematodes then eat the wire worms from the inside out, writes Michael Kelly.

Opinion: 'The DUP has a talent for fusing bungled governance with election success'

This should give us all pause for reflection on the intricacies and ironies underlying our constitutional arrangements in these islands, writes Thomas Muinzer.

# read-me - Friday 4 May, 2018

Dr Anthony O'Connor: 'It’s not about your rage or sorrow, deputies. It's about what we do next'

We need the media to move us out of their comfort zone in how the debate is framed, writes Dr Anthony O’Connor.

'The nurses asked how we planned to keep him cold. This wasn't something we were prepared for'

Things need to change in Ireland though; I don’t want any other people to have to go through what we did.

# read-me - Thursday 3 May, 2018

Column: Do we really need mandatory standardised testing in primary schools?

Learning support teachers are more than capable of screening and diagnosing learning difficulties, writes Peter Gunning.

# read-me - Wednesday 2 May, 2018

Roisin Shortall: 'Harvesting the personal data of children for marketing purposes is repugnant'

If it isn’t clearly prohibited there is no incentive for these companies to stop the practice, writes Roisin Shortall.

# read-me - Tuesday 1 May, 2018

Sugar Tax: Nanny State gone mad or a step in the right direction?

I’m a parent and I’m not immune to the never-ending debate with kids on what we eat and drink, writes Sarah O’Brien.

# read-me - Monday 30 April, 2018

Paschal Donohoe: 'Our stance on bankers' pay has remained unchanged. This is the right thing to do'

I have initiated a review of bank remuneration policy, writes Paschal Donohoe.

# read-me - Sunday 29 April, 2018

My unplanned homebirth: 'You can’t help but think "what if?"'

I will never forget the sound of my waters breaking, writes Jessica O’Neill.

Column: 'In 1857 Patrick Sheehan was arrested for begging on Grafton St'

Who was Patrick Sheehan really, asks journalist Tom Hurley.

'She was frantic, her boyfriend had assaulted her and was going to make her do sex work'

Tony Duffin the CEO of Ana Liffey Drug Project reflects on 25 years of helping people who use drugs.

# read-me - Saturday 28 April, 2018

'If someone requires an app to prove legal consent then you shouldn’t be having sex with them'

We need to make consent sexy, writes Filomena Kaguako.

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